22 Weeks!!

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Boomster, the blog icon, is here to celebrate.

Wow! It has been 22 weeks since I made this blog into being.

Stay tuned for more posts!!!

Adios for now…

Update – And the interesting thing is, I read Isaiah 22 in my morning devotions on the day this was posted!!

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18 thoughts on “22 Weeks!!

  1. WTG, Joshua! Meanwhile, how’s your chess coming?
    I want to get you started on chess openings. It’s a complicated subject, and I’ll take it slow. Openings are probably my favorite part of chess.
    A few general remarks. A lot of players don’t bother to study openings. For one thing, there are too many of them; no one can learn them all. For another, players get annoyed when they study and opening, want to use it in a game, and the opponent just won’t do what the book said he should do. I dream of the day when, as Black, I play the Albin Counter-Gambit and White stumbles into the Lasker Trap. This has happened for me only once, ever. *sigh*

    I recommend two things. First, learn general principles that apply to most openings, if not all of them. Because you’re bound to encounter openings you’ve never seen before, and you don’t want to be confused and surprised. So learn the general principles that govern them all. More on that next time.
    Second, study a few favorite openings thoroughly–very thoroughly. I, for instance, like unusual openings that may make my opponent underestimate me. I favor gambits over safe, uneventful openings. As White I’ve carefully studied the Polish Opening, 1.b4, because most opponents see it and think I must be stupid. As Black I favor Philidor’s Defense (1.e4, e5; 2. Nf3 [or something else], d6) because Black’s second move, d6, makes him look timid–but you’d be surprised how quickly the Philidor can be turned into an offensive campaign. If White opens 1.d4, I favor the Albin Counter-Gambit (1.d4, d5; 2. c4 [offering the Queen’s Gambit], e5) which can turn a dull Queen-pawn game into a real brawl. The point is, I’ve spent much time studying these openings and little time on others, trusting in my grasp of general principles to see me through to the middle of the game.

    Regardless of whether I’m playing White or Black, I try to go on the attack as soon as possible. Chess is more fun that way.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. All right, let’s try this–nothing ventured, nothing gained. My friends and I sort of invented this opening before we were old enough to read chess books. It served us well until we got better at chess.

    We call this the Playground Opening. It will work if your opponent is inexperienced, or if he takes you so lightly that he isn’t really thinking. You have to be playing White to do it. Here it is.

    1.e4, e5 2. Qh5, g6 [this is the careless move that kills him] 3.Qxe5 check, Ne7 4. Qxh8, $#@#$!
    After this, your chief concerns should be to get your Queen out of there and develop more pies (Nf3, Bc4, etc.). The temptation is to leave the Queen in Black’s territory and pick off some Pawns–but don’t do that, she might get trapped.

    Remember that the opponent, in chess openings, very often doesn’t make the moves he’s supposed to make. Don’t let that discourage you. Just keep playing and try to gain experience.
    Let me know how you make out!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Example: E5 = File E, where the Kings are: files run from A to H. Rank 5, the fifth rank counting White’s back row as the first rank and Black’s first row as the eighth.

        This is better than the old system of chess notation, in which each square had two names. In this “algebraic notation,” each square has only one name. So, for instance, when you want to move the Pawn in front of your King two squares, and you’re White, you could write it out fully as Pe2-e4; or as just e4, when the only man that could possibly move there is the King Pawn.
        Does that help?

        Liked by 1 person

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