Chess Lessons by Lee Duigon: Lesson Six

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Lesson 6

Time for a chess lesson! Introducing the Knight.

Your army starts out with two Knights on the b1 and g1 squares (if you’re White: b8 and g8 if Black).

The Knights are the special forces of your chess army. They excel in producing the unexpected. You can’t win a war with a couple of Navy SEAL companies, but they can set up situations in which your more powerful units can strike a decisive blow.
This is mostly because the Knight has sort of a weird L-shaped move–and can leap over pieces that are in the way, regardless of color. Let me see if I can succeed in posting this diagram.

Aah, didn’t work. So take out your chessboard and put a Knight on square e5.

From there he can move to any one of the following squares: d3, f3,g4,g6, f7,d7,c6, or c4. Even if he were surrounded by adjacent chessmen, he could still move to any one of those squares–by leaping over them.

A lot of beginners find it hard to learn the Knight’s move. I learned it as an L-shaped move, so that’s how I’ll teach it.

The Knight is the only back-row piece that can make your first move, by leaping over the front rank of Pawns.

The Knight’s shortcoming is his short range. He is the only piece that can’t go from one end of the board to the other in one move.

Again, the cool thing about Knights is that they can surprise an opponent. Many beginners’ games are won or lost by failure to anticipate a crucial move by a Knight.

We’ll get into more of the details in the next lesson.

Lee Duigon (Nov. 22nd, 2018)

Check out Mr. Duigon’s blog at LeeDuigon.com!! Don’t forget to give him a follow!
I really recommend The Bell Mountain Series by Lee Duigon!

Stay tuned for Lesson Seven!

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