Chess Lessons by Lee Duigon: Lesson Three

(It has been 6 months since I posted the last chess lesson by Lee Duigon, so here’s Lesson Three, the first chess lesson I will share in 2020!)

Click here for all chess lessons!

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Lesson 3 – Moving the Pawns ♟

You start with 8 Pawns lined up on the 2nd rank, in front of your pieces. Individually expendable, Pawns are nevertheless important. Beginners often don’t realize that, because it takes experience to get good use out of them. But before that, the moves.

On its first move, and only then, a Pawn may be moved either one square forward or two squares forward. All other moves are either one square straight ahead–or one square diagonally, when making a capture.

In chess, all captures are made by moving one of your men onto a square occupied by an opponent’s man, who is then removed from the game. When a capture is made, the capturing man’s move ends.

So a Pawn cannot advance if there is another chessman directly in front of it.
If a Pawn is moved all the way to the opposite end of the board, it is cashed in for a Piece of higher value. Usually that’s a Queen; occasionally, a Knight.

During the course of the game, Pawns are valuable mostly in a defensive role.

Only the Pawn can never move backwards. Remember that when you decide to move a Pawn: it can’t retreat.

The next lesson will deal with some finer points about Pawns.

Feel free to ask any questions! I’ve never done this on line before, so I may sometimes leave out something.

– By Lee Duigon, October 26th, 2018 (Posted with permission)

Check out Mr. Duigon’s blog at LeeDuigon.com!! Don’t forget to give him a follow!

I really recommend The Bell Mountain Series by Lee Duigon! You really should read those exciting books! Here’s a post about The Bell Mountain Series.

Chess Lessons by Lee Duigon: Lesson Two

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Lesson Two–Relative value of the pieces.

This is very important for beginners, who tend to make bad trade-offs. A good position is even more valuable, but it takes experience to gauge this.

For the time being, keep these numbers firmly in mind: Pawn-1, Knight or Bishop-3 (although two Bishops are a little better than two Knights), Rook (or Castle)-5, with both Rooks together being very valuable indeed, and Queen-8 (because it’s like having a Rook and a Bishop in one piece).

The King is priceless, because if you lose your King, you’ve lost the game.

These values become less important as you gain experience, but for the time being, they’re very important to your play and understanding of the game.

Chess is a game that simulates war, and it’s not a bad simulation. Think of the Pawns as foot soldiers, Knights as special forces, Bishops as tanks, Rooks as heavy artillery, and the Queen as a bunch of heavily-armed helicopters. And then always try to devise the best way to blend their different powers and abilities into a productive combination.

(October 22nd, 2018, from The Scrabble Game)

Check out Mr. Duigon’s blog at leeduigon.com!!

Chess Lessons by Lee Duigon: Lesson One

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I am very grateful to Mr. Lee Duigon for teaching me how to play chess! Thanks to Mr. Duigon, I can play chess now! Here is the very first lesson he gave me…

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OK–the first thing you have to learn is how to read the board. It’s the same as a checkerboard, but in chess, each square has a name. This is called chess notation.
Set up the board with a white square in the lower right-hand corner. The back row, the row nearest you, is lettered, left to right, “a” through “h”. The a1 square is in your lower left-hand corner, with h1 on the right. These horizontal rows are called “ranks.”
The vertical columns, 1-8, are “files.” Your back row is a1 through h1, if you’re playing White. Black’s back row is a8-h8. You need to learn this simple notation so you can read and replay chess games. That’s Lesson One.
When you’ve mastered the notation, we’ll go on to the next lesson.

(By Lee Duigon, October 21st, 2018, on The Scrabble Game)

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Please follow Lee Duigon at: http://leeduigon.wordpress.com/  And I highly recommend his Bell Mountain Series!

8 Months!

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Yes! Today marks the eighth month of my blog!

My heartfelt thanks to all those who followed my blog, commented, made friends with me, “Liked,” and viewed!

And my special thanks to God for leading me to make this blog. May He use it for His glory. Amen!

I thank you, Mr. Duigon, for recommending me to make a blog and for teaching me how to play chess!! Thanks to you, chess has been added to my game repertoire! And now I  have more friends!

Adieu for now. 😀

♟♞♜♝♛♚Geri’s Game♔♕♗♖♘♙

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Ha, ha! Checkmate!!

Geri’s Game is my favorite Pixar short animation. I first saw this on VHS. This short animation was a bonus feature in A Bug’s Life. It’s about an elderly man named Geri who plays chess all by himself. I must add that you have to click on the link that leads to YouTube to watch this. Please enjoy this Academy Award winning 1997 animation.

Quite a talent he has there! Also, I think he had too much free time.

Thanks for watching.

 

 

The Battles of The Two Brothers

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“Alright my men, the enemy has arrived! The time of the battle has come!” yelled Grand Admiral Swanson. “Prepare my ships for battle!”

Meanwhile…

“Hoist the colors! Prepare for action! To action stations, all of you, and nuts to those who dilly-dally around!” shouted Commodore J. M. Swanson.

“Is your ship on… I-12?” yelled the Grand Admiral on the radio transmitter to his enemy’s leader.

“MISSED!!” the Commodore sneered back. “Now it’s my turn… is your ship on… W-89?”

“… What on earth are you talking about?!” shouted Grand Admiral Swanson. “There is NO W-89!!!”

“Oh… sorry, let me try again. Is your ship on… E-5?”

Admiral Swanson stared blankly at his side of the game board. “But… how… YES, HIT!!”

About an hour later, the Commodore smiled at his victory. Grand Admiral Swanson’s whole fleet had sunk.

“‘Twas a good game and a really close battle!” said I, shaking my brother’s hand. “Maybe you can win next time! Well played, buddy!”

Thus ended the Battleship game.

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A few minutes later, my brother and I played a game called Othello, also known as Reversi.

“Well, well!” I thought to myself. “It looks like another winning game! He, he, he!”

It would probably have been, if Mom hadn’t crept towards bro and gave him a hint!

Every move counts, and that one move of bro’s changed the outcome.

This time, he was the winner!

Well done! Well done!

The next day, Mom and I played Othello, and…

Mom won!

And I lost two Othello games in a row…

To cry or not to cry… that is the question… WAH-HAH-HAH!! 😭

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I am now learning how to play chess from Mr. Lee Duigon, author of my favorite Christian book series, the Bell Mountain series, and I hope to be able to play chess sometime in the near future. With Mr. Duigon’s help, I want to add chess to my game repertoire!

“My opponents make good moves too. Sometimes I don’t take these things into consideration.”— Bobby Fischer

“The winner of the game is the player who makes the next-to-last mistake.” — Savielly Tartakower

“All chess masters can play one game blindfolded.” — George Koltanowski

“Chess is a game that simulates war, and it’s not a bad simulation.” — Lee Duigon